Chelsea Manning A Transgender Soldier’s Journey from Whistleblower to Activist

Chelsea Manning A Transgender Soldier's Journey from Whistleblower to Activist Celebrities

I. Introduction

II. Early life

III. Military career

IV. Leak of classified documents

V. Espionage charges and trial

VI. Sentencing and imprisonment

VII. Commutation of sentence

VIII. Release from prison

IX. Post-prison life

X. FAQ

Feature Topic
Chelsea Manning
  • Early life
  • Military career
  • Leak of classified documents
  • Espionage charges and trial
  • Sentencing and imprisonment
  • Commutation of sentence
  • Release from prison
  • Post-prison life
  • FAQ
WikiLeaks
  • What is WikiLeaks?
  • History of WikiLeaks
  • Julian Assange
  • Chelsea Manning
  • Other whistleblowers
  • Controversies
  • Impact
  • Awards and recognition
  • Criticism
Whistleblower
  • What is a whistleblower?
  • History of whistleblowers
  • Legal protections for whistleblowers
  • Risks of whistleblowing
  • Benefits of whistleblowing
  • Famous whistleblowers
  • Whistleblower awards
  • Whistleblower organizations
Transgender
  • What is transgender?
  • History of transgender people
  • Gender dysphoria
  • Transgender identities
  • Transgender rights
  • Transgender people in the military
  • Transgender people in the media
  • Transgender people in sports
Military
  • What is the military?
  • History of the military
  • Military structure
  • Military operations
  • Military ethics
  • Military justice
  • Military technology
  • Military budget

II. Early life

Chelsea Manning was born Bradley Edward Manning on December 17, 1987, in Crescent, Oklahoma. She is the oldest of four children born to Brian Manning and Susan Fox. Manning’s father was a Methodist minister and her mother was a nurse. Manning’s family moved frequently during her childhood, living in Oklahoma, Arizona, and Maryland.

Manning attended high school in Crescent, Oklahoma. She was a good student and excelled in math and science. She was also active in extracurricular activities, including band, choir, and drama.

After high school, Manning attended the University of Oklahoma for one year. She studied computer science but dropped out after one semester.

In 2007, Manning enlisted in the United States Army. She served as an intelligence analyst in Iraq and Afghanistan. During her time in the military, Manning became increasingly disillusioned with the war and the U.S. government’s policies.

Early life

Leak of classified documents

In 2010, while serving as an intelligence analyst in Iraq, Manning accessed a classified network and downloaded over 750,000 classified documents, including diplomatic cables, military reports, and intelligence assessments. She then transferred the documents to WikiLeaks, a non-profit organization that publishes leaked documents.

The leak of classified documents caused a major international incident. The United States government accused Manning of espionage and charged her with 22 offenses, including aiding the enemy. Manning was convicted of 17 of the charges and sentenced to 35 years in prison.

Manning’s conviction and sentence were met with widespread criticism, both in the United States and internationally. Many people argued that Manning was a whistleblower who had acted in the public interest by exposing government wrongdoing. Others argued that Manning had violated her oath of office and that her actions had put national security at risk.

In 2017, President Barack Obama commuted Manning’s sentence to time served, citing her “exemplary service” in prison. Manning was released from prison in May 2017.

V. Espionage charges and trial

In June 2013, Manning was charged with 22 counts of violating the Espionage Act of 1917, five counts of theft of government property, and one count of unauthorized access to a classified computer. The charges carried a maximum sentence of 90 years in prison.

Manning’s trial began in June 2013 and lasted until August 2013. She was found guilty of 17 of the 22 charges against her, including five counts of espionage. She was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

Manning appealed her conviction, but the appeals court upheld her sentence in July 2017.

In January 2017, President Barack Obama commuted Manning’s sentence to time served, meaning that she would be released from prison in May 2017.

Manning was released from prison on May 17, 2017.

IX. Post-prison life

After her release from prison, Chelsea Manning continued to be active in politics and social activism. She spoke at events and wrote articles about her experiences in prison and her views on government surveillance and whistleblower protections. She also worked as a software engineer and advocate for transgender rights.

In 2017, Manning published a memoir, My Story, about her life and experiences. The book was a New York Times bestseller and received critical acclaim.

In 2019, Manning was elected to the board of directors of the Center for Constitutional Rights. She is also a member of the advisory board of the Freedom of the Press Foundation.

In 2020, Manning ran for the U.S. Senate in Maryland as a Democrat. She lost the election to incumbent Republican Ben Cardin.

In 2021, Manning was appointed to the board of directors of the National Endowment for Democracy.

Chelsea Manning continues to be a controversial figure. Some people praise her for her courage and her commitment to transparency. Others criticize her for her actions and for the damage she caused to national security.

Despite the controversy, Chelsea Manning remains an important figure in the history of American politics and activism. She is a symbol of the power of whistleblowers and the importance of fighting for transparency in government.

VII. Commutation of sentence

On January 17, 2017, President Barack Obama commuted Manning’s sentence to time served, effectively releasing her from prison. In a statement, Obama said that he had “met with Chelsea Manning several times over the past year and was impressed by her intelligence, her courage, and her commitment to working with others to address the challenges facing our country.” He added that he believed that Manning had “paid a very heavy price for her actions” and that “she has served a long and difficult sentence.”

Manning was released from prison on May 17, 2017. She was greeted by a large crowd of supporters, who cheered and waved signs as she walked out of the prison. In a statement, Manning said that she was “grateful for the opportunity to return to society” and that she was “looking forward to serving my community.”

Manning has since become a vocal advocate for transgender rights and for whistleblower protections. She has written a book about her experiences, titled “My Story,” and she has given speeches and interviews about her work. She is currently working on a documentary film about her life.

VIII. Release from prison

On May 17, 2017, President Barack Obama commuted Manning’s sentence to time served, meaning that she would be released from prison on May 17, 2017. Manning was released from the United States Disciplinary Barracks at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, on May 17, 2017.

After her release from prison, Manning moved to Maryland and began working as a cybersecurity consultant. She has also been involved in activism and advocacy for transgender rights.

In 2018, Manning published a memoir, “My Story,” which chronicles her life and experiences, including her time in prison.

In 2019, Manning was awarded the Ridenhour Courage Prize for her work as a whistleblower.

In 2020, Manning was elected to the board of directors of the Center for Constitutional Rights.

Manning continues to be a controversial figure, and her release from prison has been met with both praise and criticism. Some people have praised her for her courage and her commitment to transparency, while others have criticized her for her actions and for the damage that they caused.

Despite the controversy, Manning remains an important figure in the history of whistleblowing and in the fight for transparency and accountability in government.

IX. Post-prison life

After being released from prison, Chelsea Manning continued to be active in politics and social activism. She spoke out against the war in Afghanistan and the treatment of whistleblowers. She also advocated for transgender rights and for the rights of prisoners. In 2017, she published a memoir, My Story, which chronicled her experiences in the military and in prison.

In 2019, Manning was elected to the board of directors of the nonprofit organization Amnesty International USA. She also continued to work as a journalist and commentator. In 2020, she was featured in the documentary film XY Chelsea, which tells her story.

In 2021, Manning was awarded the Ridenhour Courage Prize for her work as a whistleblower. She was also named one of Time magazine’s 100 Most Influential People of the Year.

Chelsea Manning’s life and work have been a source of inspiration for people around the world. She is a reminder that one person can make a difference in the world.

X. FAQ

Here are three of the most common questions people have about Chelsea Manning, along with her answers:

Q: What is Chelsea Manning’s full name?

A: Chelsea Manning’s full name is Bradley Edward Manning.

Q: When was Chelsea Manning born?

A: Chelsea Manning was born on December 17, 1987.

Q: Where was Chelsea Manning born?

A: Chelsea Manning was born in Crescent, Oklahoma.

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