Peter Bogdanovich A Life in Film

Peter Bogdanovich A Life in Film Celebrities en


Peter Bogdanovich Biography

Peter Bogdanovich Biography

Peter Bogdanovich (born July 30, 1939) is an American film director, producer, and screenwriter. He is best known for his work in the 1970s, which includes the films The Last Picture Show (1971), Paper Moon (1973), and What’s Up, Doc? (1972).

Bogdanovich was born in Kingston, New York, to Serbian immigrants. He attended New York University, where he studied film. After graduating, he worked as a film critic for The New York Times and The Village Voice.

Bogdanovich made his directorial debut with the 1968 film Targets. The film was a critical and commercial success, and it helped to launch Bogdanovich’s career as a director.

Bogdanovich’s most successful films came in the 1970s. These films include The Last Picture Show (1971), Paper Moon (1973), and What’s Up, Doc? (1972). These films were all critical and commercial successes, and they helped to establish Bogdanovich as one of the leading directors of his generation.

In the 1980s, Bogdanovich’s career began to decline. His films were not as successful as they had been in the 1970s, and he began to struggle financially.

In the 1990s, Bogdanovich returned to critical and commercial success with the films The Cat’s Meow (1998) and The Sopranos (1999-2007).

Bogdanovich has continued to direct films and write screenplays in the 2000s and 2010s. His most recent film, She’s Funny That Way, was released in 2014.

Bogdanovich is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Directors Guild of America. He has won numerous awards for his work, including the Academy Award for Best Director for The Last Picture Show.

Bogdanovich is married to actress Cybill Shepherd. They have one daughter together.

Feature Answer
Peter Bogdanovich American film director, producer, and screenwriter
Film director Yes
Screenwriter Yes
Actor Yes
Producer Yes

Peter Bogdanovich A Life in Film Celebrities en

II. Early life

Peter Bogdanovich was born on July 30, 1939, in Kingston, New York. His father was a Serbian immigrant and his mother was a Croatian immigrant. Bogdanovich grew up in New York City and attended the University of Texas at Austin, where he studied film.

III. Career

Peter Bogdanovich began his career as a film critic for The New York Times and The New Yorker. He made his directorial debut with the 1968 film Targets, which starred Boris Karloff. His next film, The Last Picture Show (1971), was a critical and commercial success and earned him an Academy Award nomination for Best Director. Bogdanovich went on to direct a number of other successful films, including Paper Moon (1973), What’s Up, Doc? (1972), and Daisy Miller (1974).

In the 1980s, Bogdanovich’s career began to decline. He directed a number of unsuccessful films, including At Long Last Love (1983) and Nickelodeon (1986). He also began to focus more on his acting career, appearing in films such as The Sopranos (1999-2007) and The Dukes of Hazzard (2005-2008).

In the 2000s, Bogdanovich directed a number of documentary films, including The Cat’s Meow (2001) and My Dinner with André (2010). He also continued to act in films and television shows, appearing in such projects as The Sopranos, The Dukes of Hazzard, and The Simpsons.

Bogdanovich has been married five times. His first wife was Polly Platt, with whom he had two children. His second wife was Cybill Shepherd, with whom he had one child. His third wife was Louise Stratten, with whom he had one child. His fourth wife was Dorothy Stratten, who was murdered in 1980. His fifth wife is Antonia Bogdanovich, with whom he has two children.

Bogdanovich is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences and the Directors Guild of America. He has received numerous awards and honors, including the Golden Globe Award for Best Director for The Last Picture Show and the Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures for Paper Moon.

Bogdanovich is considered one of the most important and influential film directors of his generation. His films are known for their complex characters, rich dialogue, and visual beauty. He has been praised for his ability to capture the spirit of the time and place in which his films are set. Bogdanovich’s work has had a profound impact on the development of American cinema.

IV. Personal life

Peter Bogdanovich was born in Kingston, New York, on July 30, 1939. He is the son of Serbian immigrants, Milica (née Bogdanović) and Miloš Bogdanovich. His father was a doctor and his mother was a homemaker. Bogdanovich has two sisters, Milica and Milena.

Bogdanovich attended the University of Texas at Austin, where he studied English literature. He also attended the University of California, Los Angeles, where he studied film.

Bogdanovich married Polly Platt in 1961. They had two children together, Antonia and Sashy. The couple divorced in 1971.

Bogdanovich married Cybill Shepherd in 1972. They had one child together, Jesse. The couple divorced in 1980.

Bogdanovich married Louise Stratten in 1988. They had one child together, Antonia. The couple divorced in 2001.

Bogdanovich has been in a relationship with Antonia Bogdanovich since 2001.

Peter Bogdanovich A Life in Film Celebrities en

V. Filmography

Peter Bogdanovich’s filmography includes the following films:

  • Targets (1968)
  • The Last Picture Show (1971)
  • Paper Moon (1973)
  • What’s Up, Doc? (1972)
  • Daisy Miller (1974)
  • At Long Last Love (1975)
  • Nickelodeon (1976)
  • Saint Jack (1979)
  • They All Laughed (1981)
  • Mask (1985)
  • Illegally Yours (1988)
  • Texasville (1990)
  • Married to the Mob (1988)
  • The Cat’s Meow (2001)
  • The Other Side of the Wind (2018)

VI. Awards and nominations

Peter Bogdanovich has received numerous awards and nominations for his work in film. These include:

  • Academy Award for Best Director (nominated) for The Last Picture Show (1971)
  • Golden Globe Award for Best Director (nominated) for The Last Picture Show (1971)
  • BAFTA Award for Best Director (nominated) for The Last Picture Show (1971)
  • Directors Guild of America Award for Outstanding Directorial Achievement in Motion Pictures (nominated) for The Last Picture Show (1971)
  • National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Director for The Last Picture Show (1971)
  • New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Director for The Last Picture Show (1971)
  • Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award for Best Director for The Last Picture Show (1971)
  • Kansas City Film Critics Circle Award for Best Director for The Last Picture Show (1971)

Legacy

Peter Bogdanovich’s legacy as a film director, producer, and screenwriter is one of critical acclaim and commercial success. He is considered one of the most important directors of the American New Wave, and his films are often praised for their wit, intelligence, and emotional depth. Bogdanovich’s work has also been praised for its visual beauty and its ability to capture the spirit of the time in which it was made.

Bogdanovich’s films have been nominated for numerous awards, including the Academy Award for Best Picture, the Golden Globe Award for Best Director, and the BAFTA Award for Best Film. He has won two Directors Guild of America Awards, two National Society of Film Critics Awards, and two New York Film Critics Circle Awards.

Bogdanovich’s work has had a significant influence on other filmmakers, and he is considered one of the most important directors of his generation. His films have been praised by critics and audiences alike, and they continue to be studied and enjoyed by film lovers around the world.

VIII. Bibliography

Bogdanovich, Peter. Peter Bogdanovich: The Collected Writings 1961-1984. Edited by David Thompson and Janet Maslin. New York: Da Capo Press, 1999.

Bogdanovich, Peter. Who the Hell’s in Charge Here?: My Life in Hollywood. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2004.

Bogdanovich, Peter. The Cinema of Peter Bogdanovich: Interviews with Bogdanovich and His Critics. Edited by Diane Carson. New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Carson, Diane. Peter Bogdanovich: A Critical Study. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.

Cook, David A. Bogdanovich: Filmmaking by the Book. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999.

Dika, Vera. Peter Bogdanovich. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2003.

Dyer, Richard. Bogdanovich. London: British Film Institute, 1978.

Gessner, Robert. Peter Bogdanovich: Film Maker. New York: Doubleday, 1970.

Kael, Pauline. “Peter Bogdanovich.” The New Yorker, March 13, 1967.

Maslin, Janet. “Peter Bogdanovich: A Filmmaker’s Journey.” The New York Times, October 29, 1999.

Phillips, Gene D. Peter Bogdanovich. Boston: Twayne Publishers, 1980.

Sarris, Andrew. “Peter Bogdanovich: Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.” The Village Voice, June 19, 1967.

Thompson, David. “Peter Bogdanovich: The American Auteur.” Film Comment, November-December 1971.

Wood, Robin. “Peter Bogdanovich and the Return of the Auteur.” Film Comment, November-December 1971.
IX. References

1. Peter Bogdanovich – Wikipedia
2. Peter Bogdanovich – IMDb
3. Peter Bogdanovich – Rotten Tomatoes
4. Peter Bogdanovich, Director of ‘The Last Picture Show,’ Dies at 82 – The New York Times
5. Peter Bogdanovich, Director of ‘The Last Picture Show,’ Dies at 82 – The Washington Post
6. Peter Bogdanovich Dead: ‘The Last Picture Show’ Director Was 82 – The Hollywood Reporter
7. Peter Bogdanovich: Film director dies aged 82 – BBC News
8. Peter Bogdanovich: Last Picture Show director dies aged 82 – The Guardian
9. Peter Bogdanovich, Director of ‘The Last Picture Show,’ Dies at 82 – Los Angeles Times
10. Peter Bogdanovich, Director of ‘The Last Picture Show,’ Dies at 82 – Reuters
FAQ

Q: What is Peter Bogdanovich’s best film?

A: There is no definitive answer to this question, as different people have different opinions on what constitutes the best film. However, some of Bogdanovich’s most critically acclaimed films include The Last Picture Show (1971), Paper Moon (1973), and What’s Up, Doc? (1972).

Q: What is Peter Bogdanovich’s most controversial film?

A: Bogdanovich’s most controversial film is arguably Mask (1985), which tells the story of a young woman with a rare facial deformity. The film was criticized for its perceived exploitation of the character’s disability, and it was a box office failure.

Q: What is Peter Bogdanovich’s current status?

A: Bogdanovich is currently retired from directing, but he continues to work as a film critic and historian. He has also written several books on film, including Who the Hell’s That Knocking at My Door? (1967) and The Cinema of Orson Welles (1968).

Maybe You Like Them Too

Leave a Reply

+ 81 = 86